Greenspeed GT 20

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Greenspeed GT20
Greenspeed GT20

  • Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed
    Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed
  • Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed
    Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed
  • Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed
    Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed
  • Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed
    Queensland Recumbent - GT20 from Greenspeed

NB: GT20 has single allan key screw for front wheel release (not Quick Release axles like Magnum).

The take from Greenspeed

We’ve taken a serious look at what made the GTO handle so superbly, and managed to retain these features, while using the features like:

  • folding aluminium frame
  • adjustable seat, which has made the Magnum such a popular trike

We’ve designed our own wheels and had them specially made for us with our own design of hubs. These hubs enable us to combine the superior steering of the early GTOs, with its light feel and pinpoint accuracy, with the absence of brake steer, and a tighter turning circle which characterised the later Series II GT3s and Magnums, but at the expense of a heavier steering. Plus we have reduced the weight of all the steering components.

We designed the Scorcher tyres especially for our trikes, with lower rolling resistance than any other tyre. We took a fresh look at the design and had new tyres made. In testing these tyres they were found to roll 18.7% better than the previous Scorchers. An added bonus is that tyres which roll easier also give a better ride. Thus these tyres are fitted as standard to every GT20.

Each time you push on the pedals of a trike, the boom and frame will flex down, as the pedals are at the end of a long, unsupported boom, plus the frame behind the cross member will flex up. Most of the flex occurs in the main tube, so to reduce frame flex the GT20 uses a rectangular main tube and crank extension. This tubing is both stiffer and lighter than the round tubing used on the heavier Magnum trike. Plus it keeps the cranks in perfect alignment, when the leg length is adjusted, making adjustment easier and quicker. Plus it prevents the crank extension from twisting under sudden acceleration if the clamping bolts are not tight.

In recent years, there has been a move to add more cogs to the rear cassette to provide more gears, so that 10 cogs now occupy the same space as 8 used to. Thus the cogs have gotten thinner, as have the chains. The problem here is that the side links of the chain need to be the same thickness for strength, so the internal bearing surfaces of the chain have had to be reduced. With the higher loading on the bearing surfaces this has reduced both the efficiency and the life of the chains. As an example, when servicing a well used, 23 year old Greenspeed trike last year, which only had a 7 speed cassette, it was found to still have the original 7 speed chain! Not only that, the chain was still within the standard wear limit of 1/16” per 12” of chain! As there has been a movement to using single gear bikes, one has to question the need for a large number of gears. In fact, I find I am changing at least two gears at a time on my 9 speed trike. Thus the GT 20 has only an eight speed cassette at the rear, and a triple at the front, giving only 24 “gears” or combinations. More important than the number of combinations, is the gear range. The GT20 has a particularly wide range of gears, with an 11/34 cassette, and a 56/42/28 triple, giving a range from 16 to 102 gear inches or 612%. Another critical aspect of gearing is the change. Some trikes use twist grip shifters. These maybe OK for the horizontal handle bars on some bikes, when you can get your thumb and fore fingers around them, but on the vertical handle bars of most trikes you can only easily get your two small fingers around them, which can make gear changing a pain. On the GT20 we use the Shimano Ultegra Bar End shifters, so gear changing is much easier than with twist grip shifters. Furthermore, we use a special Micro Shift front derailleur which needs only half the force to operate it than an equivalent Shimano front derailleur.

Many trikes use disc brakes. However these need careful adjustment, make the wheels harder to remove, have a short pad life, and are prone to squealing. The GT20 uses special 90 mm drum brakes, which have over 4 times the lining area of disc brakes, which makes them practically ever lasting. Plus they are 30% more powerful that the standard 70 mm drums, and very easy to adjust.

Some people have difficulty getting in and out of the low seat of most trikes. The GT20 seat height is adjustable from 12 inches to 17 inches, the height of a standard kitchen chair. The lower the seat, the lower the centre of gravity and the better the trike will handle, so that you can take corners faster without have to lean too much, and it will brake better from high speed. Thus if you are carrying too much weight to get in and out of the low seat, or have a leg problem, you can use the trike with the seat in the higher position, and then as you drop weight with the easy exercise the trike provides, or/and get fitter, you can use the lower position and enjoy more fun with the lower center of gravity. To make entry and exit even easier, the GT20 has a curved cross member, so you can get your feet closer to the seat We have moved the steering rods back, so they do not restrict access to the seat and grab handles are available to assist entry and exit.

Like the GT3 and the Magnum the seat has been designed by a chiropractor so that it has proper lumbar and shoulder support. Instead of having a closed fabric like some trikes, the seat cover mesh is open weave so that it provides cooling to your back in warm or hot weather. It’s laced to the seat frame with shock cord, so that the seat cover conforms to the shape of YOUR back. The seat frame has been anodized instead of powder coated. Thus the suspension aspect of the seat is enhanced, as it’s easier for the seat cover to slide over the rails, protecting you from road shock.

Another feature of the seat is that it’s adjustable for rake, or angle. The more you recline the seat, the lower the center of gravity, the less frontal area you present to the wind, and the faster you go. Some riders may prefer a more upright seat for visibility, so with the GT20 you can quickly adjust your seat angle without tools. A headrest is available if you prefer a more laidback position, but need head support.

The GT20 was exhibited for the 1st time at the Recumbent CycleCon tradeshow in Cincinnati in October 2015. This show had most of the recumbent trikes from all over the world on display and available for testing. Four riders told me they had ridden every trike at the show, but the GT20 was the best. Jim Snider from Ride South, Brandon Mississippi, bought the trike for his shop. He sold it to a customer who already had 4 trikes, and lived in a hilly area. He told Jim that on the GT20 he could climb hills in two gears higher than he could on all his other trikes!

We are hoping to get the GT20 into production and have trikes delivered to the USA in March or April, 2016. When the Magnum was 1st released back in 2012, it was in short supply for a long time and judging by the comments we’ve had about the GT20, we’re expecting it to sell even faster. If you’re interested, we advise pre-ordering with a dealer to avoid disappointment.

GT20 Specs

Frame Aluminium 7005 Alloy removable seat and centre fold
Width 31″ – 79 cms
Length 76″ – 193 cms *
Height 27″ – 69 cms
Seat Height 12 to 17″ – 30 to 43cms
Seat Angle 30 to 48 degrees
X-seam range 41 to 51″ – 104 to 130 cms
Ground Clearance 6″ – 15 cms
Turning Circle 12 feet – 3.7 m
Track 29.5″ – 75 cms
Wheelbase 39″ – 100 cms
Front Wheels 20”, alloy rims with stainless steel spokes – single allan key screw (not QR)
Rear Wheel 20”, alloy rims with stainless steel spokes
Tires Greenspeed Slick, 20 x 1.5″ – 40-406, 40 to 100 psi.
Gears 24 speeds
Cranks Shun 56/42/28 x 165 mm
Cassette Shimano 8 sp. 11/34
Front derailleur Micro Shift
Rear derailleur Shimano
Chain YBN S8
Shifters Shimano Ultegra Bar End 8 speed
Gear Range 16″ to 102″ – 618%
Brakes GS – Sturmey Archer 90 mm drums
Standard equipment Rear mudguard, safety flag
Optional extras Mirror, head rest, luggage rack.
Rider weight limit 250 lbs – 120 kg
Luggage weight limit 66 lbs – 30 kg
Trike weight 37 lbs – 17kg
Price $2,690 in Melbourne ~ $2,840 in Tewantin

Other Greenspeed Recumbent models available on request

We are able to supply all Greenspeed models.

Size Modifications

For size variations to the standard trikes, see the kids page.

Recumbent Trike Pricing at Tewantin




Recumbent Trikes from Greenspeed

Our price base is as per Melbourne prices other than we have a freight component to get the trikes from Melbourne to Tewantin.
The cost of freight + $150 per recumbent trike.

These prices here are a guide only, are applicable only to initial package upgrades
and not for individual after-market items - ie: not fitted later to previous purchase.
Other options and modifications are available.

Queensland Recumbent

Trikes

Magnum from Greenspeed $3,440 (inc freight)
OR
GT20 from Greenspeed $2,840 (inc freight)

Queensland Recumbent

General Upgrades

Grab Handles (one side - requires Accessory Post) $15
Mirror (one side - requires Accessory Post) $30
Accessory Posts and Clamp (one side) $44
Grab Handles (second side - requires 2nd Post) $15
Mirror (second side - requires Accessory Post) $30
Accessory Posts and Clamp (second side) $44

OR
Accessory Posts, Clamps, Handles and Mirrors (Both Sides) $178
Queensland Recumbent

Bell Mirrycle Incredibell - XL (req. on public roads) $10
Shimano M324 SPD combination pedals $85
Head rest $139
Chain Gobbler $145
Computer/GPS Mount (fits to accessory post) $25
Nu-Vinci 380 Continuous Variable Speed Hub $499 *
Schulmpf Speed/Mountain Drive $599 *
Schlumpf Crank kick plates $12


Queensland Recumbent

MAGNUM specific Upgrades

Magnum 40kg Rack $125


Queensland Recumbent

GT20 specific Upgrades

GT20 30kg Rack $89

* Price relates to upgrade on original purchase only, not later purchase.